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of electricity they use. some use as much electricity as a medium-sized town. it is a very secretive industry. they tend to be hiding in plain sight. littlees you'll see diesel generators on the side. those are backup power supplies. and it is a data center. >> were those located at the road they're all over the place. they're in high rises in cities, in greenfield sites out in suburban areas, there tucked away in the back of offices. they are the way that most commerce takes place now. everyone has to have one. there are concentrations of the in the country. northern virginia, silicon valley. they're everywhere at this point. >> who runs them? >> a variety of players. companies that need these for their regular business owns some of these data centers, everything from walmart to microsoft. there is also a culture or commerce of renting space in dissenters. those are lesser-known names. one of them will sell you time on servers or space on servers. >> mr. glanz, what is contained inside these warehouse buildings? >> they're fairly boring places to visit. they are stacked with these modular co
us this gregory of the center for democracy and technology. what is the current law when it comes to law enforcement and e- mails and cell phones? >> the short answer is that it is confused. for e-mail that is less than 180 days old, law makers need a warrant. for more than 180 days, it is just a subpoenas of there is no judicial intervention or high standard of proof. for documents to store in the clouds, that is also available with a subpoena. with cell phones there is the statutory provision. this has been in different places. they need a warrant. others say if it is gps location they need a warrant. there is not a clear role. >> what are the changes that the senate judiciary committee has approved? >> they focused on content of communications. they said it should not matter how old the content is. it should matter how you started with a service provider or that one. they said there should be a warrant required. they maintain the existing exceptions to the requirement in current law. if there is this, they are able to get a voluntary disclosure from the provider right away. >>
that i own it is the most powerful i have used and i loved it. the opening is large so it will not water all over the place i do not know why they make a small for that. this is the perfect weight you just push this two fingers and let it do the job for you. $49.95 is normally $100 on hsn that 50% off. you look perfect for the holiday season. today is the day to buy it before3 sells out. 1800 watt if they do not make them more powerful than that. the lovely darlene cahill will be here with that. let us see tamara hooks cleaned the kitchen and bathroom with her bissell steam shot. you will be able to eat off the floor when she is done. you are getting 2 steamers, you can on and give one way for a gift. we are so smart. tamara hooks will take you through the door of this. this will clean indoor toilet bowl. this whole thing works together as a super bright flashlight each one breaks 43 flashlights.it is an amazing three in one. all that and so much more duringur no. 3 of hsn today [♪ music ♪] >>host: as guy yovan and said we will take a very quick look aty's special and has already be
changes may mean two different groups. joining us here on our washington d.c. site is gregory nojeim at the center for democracy and technology. what is the current law when it comes to law enforcement and e-mails and cell phones? >> guest: the short answer is that is confused and the longer answer is for e-mail that is less than 180 days old law enforcement need to warrant -- for e-mail more than 180 years old, it is just a subpoena, so there's no judicial intervention, no high standard of proof. for documents you store in the clouds, if you store something with google docs and come back and edit it, that is available with a subpoena. cell phones, there is no statutory provision about location information. so the courts have been in different places. some say if it is real-time location, for that they need a warrant. others say this gps location for that they need a warrant. there is not a clear rule yet for cell phone. >> host: what are the changes the judicial committee has approved? >> guest: they focus on content of communications. they said it should matter how will the content
", and this is the first of several conversations we're going to have looking at the future of television. helping us to kick off this series is gordon smith, former senator for the state of oregon, current president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters. welcome, sir. >> guest: thank you. good to be back. >> host: also joining us for the conversation, ted gotsch of telecommunications report, serves as senior editor. senator smith, could you start by talking to us about how people watch television in the current day as say even opposed to fife years ago -- five years ago? >> guest: well, clearly, a lot is happening in telecommunications generally, and broadcasting is affected by that. we're sort of the original wireless, but we remain highly relevant because what we do tends, it is local, and as to those who want to get it the old-fashioned way, it is free. and yet you have satellite, you have cable, and now you have the internet through hulu and netflix and others that are other ways for people to access television. so television remains highly relevant to the future because when you l
on telecommunications. >> welcome to "the communicators." looking at the future of television. welcome, sir. joining us for the conversation, the senior editor. senator smith, could you start by talking to us about how people watch television in the current day, as opposed to five years ago? >> clearly, a lot is happening and telecommunications generally. broadcasting is affected by that. what we do is local. to those who want to do it the old-fashioned way, it is free. and yet we have satellite and cable, and now we have the internet through blue -- hulu, and netflix. it remains relevant. when you look at the top television programs, 90 of them are broadcast this way. i think that the future of broadcast television is very bright, indeed. >> host: what challenges are you looking for in the future? >> guest: we are a mobile society and we want to be connected every hour of every moment of every day. the challenge is to make sure that we are on ipads and computers and phones, as well as the traditional viewing of the tv in the living room. the other challenge that we have, obviously, if the spectrum, it
, gordon smith. >> good to be back. >> senator smith, could you start by talking to us about how people watch television in the current day as, say, opposed to a few years ago? >> broadcasting is affected by that. we remain highly relevant because what we do is local, and as to those who want to get it the old-fashioned way, it is free, and yet, you have satellite, you have cable, and now you have the internet, through hulu or netflix, which are other ways to access television, so television remains highly relevant to the future. when you look at the top 100 programs that are watched, 90 of them are broadcast, -- content. i think the future is bright, indeed. -- 90 of them are broadcast content. we are a mobile society, and so the challenge is to make sure that we are on pads, computers, phones, as well as traditional viewing, now with a wonderful high-definition television screen. the other challenge we have is that spectrum is a finite resource, and others want that resource, and there is not enough spectrum in the resources to do all video by broadband, so the architecture in the loc
of the hardware around it. >> is defined what a network is an describe it to us. >> sure. that is the holy grail of understanding what the internet is in physical terms. i network on the internet is known as an autonomous system. it operates autonomously. it might be of any scale. it could be a huge network like verizon or telecom. it might be the network of a long-term that spans from new york to los angeles. but is striking and what is necessary to understand is the way it manifests itself physically that networks carried networks. you might have a level 3 that owns the strands of glass and on the conduits that perhaps spread like railroad tracks across the country. there are midsize network companies that might shall illuminate those glass. they might own the light. there is another company, maybe a goldman sachs or a large law firm, that advises on that glass. ee often talk about the interi information superhighway. i like to think of it more that a network is a car that is tugging along the highway side- by-side with other networks. there is definitely a layering going on. that is crucial t
join us michael powell. thank you for being on "the communicators" again. we appreciate it. if you would, put on your future glasses. >> they are on. >> look ahead. 15, 20 years. what is tv going to look like? what is the cable industry going to look like? >> i would say it followed the technological trends that have transformed all the businesses. the first and would probably observe is the dramatic shift from hardware to software- centered systems. the minute you are able to do more in software rather than proprietary hardware, i think that is coming to television. you are right to ask the consumer what is dtv experience in the home. they will talk about a box that sits on the credenza. they will talk about the remote control. they will talk about what they do not like about that, to be perfectly candid. but they will talk about halt all of this will be migrated into software rather than proprietary hardware, and i think you will get innovation. a company like time warner or comcast can innovate overnight, not with the hardware replacement. then, i think you see the other great t
at the future of tv, and this week we're pleased to have joining us the president and ceo of the national cable and telecommunications association, michael powell. mr. powell, thank you for being on "the communicators" again, we appreciate it. >> guest: my pleasure. >> host: if you would, put on your future glasses. >> guest: all right. [laughter] they're on. >> host: look ahead five years, ten years, twenty years. what's tv gonna look like, and especially what's the cable industry gone 2345 look like? >> guest: well, i think if i were answering that question, i would say follow the technological trends that are transforming all digital businesses. the first that i would probably observe is the dramatic shift from hardware to software-centric systems. the minute you are able to do more in software rather than proprietary hardware, i think the full creativity of software engineering comes into play. i think that's coming to television. right now if you ask the consumer what's the tv experience in my home, they'll talk about a box that sits on their credenza above their tv, they'll talk about a r
around the tv jungle. >> host: also joining us is lynn standon, senior editor tell communications reports. >> guest: how important role do you think the media will play in connecting with your tv experience down the road? >> guest: that's a great question. if you think about social media, it's just conversation. television has always been about conversation. it's not always been about, that moment you're watching it. the intimate pleasure you get, the credits roll on your favorite show, you have an immediate emotional enjoyment. what do you want to do? i want to call my sister and see what she thought about the final scene. i have been doing that for 30 years. when you go to work the next day, i don't know.your offices, one of the first things that happens at staff meetings, did you see so and so last night? the conversation is an enormous component of the full experience, and so i think sobel metworking is a brilliant invention in the history of technological inventions and communication, because it allows group-to-group communication in a really efficient way that other communication to
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11